Consuming the SharePoint Online REST API from PowerShell: Part 2

Introduction

A while back ago we already discussed how to  consume SharePoint Online (SPO) REST in PowerShell. Here is a brief recap:

This time I would like demonstrate another approach, in particular  how PowerShell can gain authorization to SharePoint resources by passing an access token to SharePoint with each HTTP request. To issue an access token from Microsoft Azure Access Control Service (ACS) that allows the app access to the resources in the SharePoint tenancy we will implement the corresponding PowerShell function. Let’s get started.

Getting Access Token from Microsoft Azure Access Control Service

The Get-SPOAccessToken function demonstrates how to obtain the access token from a Microsoft Azure Access Control Service (ACS) account that is associated with the customer’s Microsoft Office 365 tenancy:

Get-SPOAccessToken function is intended for requesting an access token from Azure ACS, it accepts  Client Id and Client Secret parameters that are generated while App registration with Azure ACS (see “How to register App” for a more details).

Using Invoke-RestMethod in Office 365

Invoke-SPORestMethod function demonstrates how to  include the access token to make a REST API call  to SharePoint, passing the OAuth access token in the HTTP Authorization header:

Examples

The following example demonstrates how to retrieve List resource properties:

But before running the specified script we need to perform one more step in order to grant permissions to the app principal otherwise the unauthorized error will occur as shown on picture below:
Rest401

  • Navigate to http://<SharePointWebsite>/_layouts/15/AppInv.aspx
  • Look up the app based on the Client ID that you just generated and click Lookup, it will find the app principal.  Then paste the AppPermissionRequests XML into the Permissions text box and click CreateAppInv
    Once you click Create, the Trust dialog will appear, click Trust
    AppInv_Trust

That’s it.  Now, after executing the specified script, the output will look like shown below

Get-SPOList-Results

How to register App

Below is provided a step by step instruction how to register an App, for a complete guide follow this article:

  • To create the app identity, navigate to http://<SharePointWebsite>/_layouts/15/AppRegNew.aspx on the tenancy or farm
  • Enter values for the form fields as shown below on picture
    AppNewReg_NewForm
    where
    App ID: App ID, also known as client ID, is a GUID that can be generated (when you click Generate) or pasted into AppRegNew.aspx. The value must be unique for each app, and must be lower case
    App Secret: The app secret, also known as the client secret, is an opaque string. It is generated on the AppRegNew.aspx page by using the Generate button. The following is an example of an app secret: Ywjaoz7DJBGhoLQ2t0IbVCA5pfqqI722ZIVt+ENLk0g=
    Title: Choose your own user-friendly title; for example, PowerShell Console
    App Domain:
    The host name of the remote component of the app for SharePoint
    Redirect URI: The endpoint in your remote application or service to which ACS sends an authentication code
  • Click Create on the form. The page will reload and show a confirmation of the values you entered as shown on picture below
    AppNewReg
  • Save Client Id and Client Secret values. After that you could verify whether Get-SPOAccessToken function returns access token. The picture below shows  the output after executing the command:
    Get-SPOAccessToken -ClientId “1523cf05-b437-4e73-9ad1-a652da8f2ae5” -ClientSecret “Ywjaoz7DJBGhoLQ2t0IbVCA5pfqqI722ZIVt+ENLk0g=” -WebUri “https://contoso.sharepoint.com/&#8221;
    ISE_AccessToken

References

Advertisements

Manage User Custom Actions in Office 365

Overview

Custom Actions offer a flexible way to extend capabilities of the SharePoint. The possibilities span the range of including custom JavaScript on every page to extending the Ribbon. In SharePoint 2013/SharePoint Online you can leverage the CSOM/REST  to manage custom actions. Below are demonstrated two simple examples of using custom actions in real world scenarios and I hope you you’ll find them useful.

Example 1. Enable jQuery

Let’s get started with an example that demonstrate how to add jQuery library to Office 365/SharePoint Online site. Unfortunately  it is not supported to reference external resources, for example from Microsoft Ajax Content Delivery Network (CDN) that hosts popular third party JavaScript libraries including jQuery. The prerequisite for referencing JavaScript files is that they could only be accesible when located within the site collection. So, the first step would be to save a jQuery library into Style Library: /Style Library/Scripts/jQuery/jquery-2.1.1.js.

The following Activate-JQuery.ps1 script  demonstrates how to enable jQuery library  in Office 365/SharePoint Online site

Dependencies: UserCustomActions.ps1

Example 2. Enable Google Analytics

The following Activate-GoogleAnalytics.ps1 script demonstrates how to activate tracking code in Office 365/SharePoint Online site

Dependencies: UserCustomActions.ps1

Follow these instructions to use Google Analytics to collect data from Office 365/SharePoint Online sites.

To set up the web tracking code:

  1. Find the tracking code snippet for your property.
    Sign in to your Google Analytics account, and click Admin in the top menu bar. From the Account and Propertycolumns, select the property you’re working with. Click Tracking Info / Tracking Code.
    SNP_8C6378625835DB93E9293E76F24E9AC45177_3517951_en_v4
  2. Find your tracking code snippet. It’s in a box with several lines of JavaScript in it. Everything in this box is your tracking code snippet. It starts with <script> and ends with </script>.
    The tracking code contains a unique ID that corresponds to each Google Analytics property. Don’t mix up tracking code snippets from different properties, and don’t reuse the same tracking code snippet on multiple domains. Click to expand this image and see where the tracking code snippet is in the interface.
  3. Open , paste the tracking code into $TrackingCode variable and run the script to register tracking code in Office 365/SharePoint Online site
  4. Check your set up.
    Make sure that the tracking snippet installed on your website matches the code shown in the view, and see more ways you can verify your set up.

Working with folders and files via SharePoint 2013 REST in PowerShell

Overview

In the previous post we’ve already discussed how to perform CRUD operations by sending HTTPS requests to SharePoint RESTful web services in PoweShell. The Invoke-RestSPO function was introduced for that purpose since  Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet does not support claims based authentication and it makes this cmdlet impossible to use in O365 and SharePoint Online scenarios.

This time I am going to demonstrate how  to perform basic create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) operations on folders and files with the SharePoint 2013 REST interface using Invoke-RestSPO function.

Explore the REST service files and folder syntax

SharePoint 20123 Files and Folders REST syntax

 

Working with folders

Folder resource: represents a folder on a SharePoint Web site

Endpoint URI: http://<site url>/_api/web/getfolderbyserverrelativeurl(‘/<folder name>‘)

Supported HTTP methods:  GET  |  POST  |  DELETE  |  MERGE  |  PUT

The following examples demonstrates how to perform basic CRUD operations with Folder resource.

 

 

Working with files

Folder resource: represents a file in a SharePoint Web site that can be a Web Part Page, an item in a document library, or a file in a folder.

Endpoint URI: http://<site url>/_api/web/getfilebyserverrelativeurl(‘/<folder name>/<file name>‘)

Supported HTTP methods:  GET  |  DELETE  |  POST  (File resource)

The following examples demonstrates how to perform basic operations with File resource including:

  • upload file into SharePoint
  • download  file from a SharePoint

 

Summary

To summarize, it was demonstrates how to perform basic operations with files and folders, in particular how to  download and upload files via REST. For that purpose we  utilized Invoke-RestSPO function  that is intended for sending HTTPS requests to O365/SharePoint Online REST service.

References

How to: Upload files into Office 365 via PowerShell

Overview

Being one of the most common questions “How to upload files to SharePoint Library?”, i noticed that usually folder structure is not taken into account in the provided solutions.
So i decided to fill the gap and implement another version that allows to preserve folder structure while uploading files.

Prerequisites

PowerShell script

PowerShell script demonstrates how to upload  files within a specified local directory to a Document Library within a Site in an O365 tenant.

 

Consuming the SharePoint 2013 REST API from PowerShell

Introduction

SharePoint 2013 introduces a Representational State Transfer (REST) service that is comparable to the  SharePoint CSOM and in addition to CSOM, REST API opens up a huge capabilities, in particular for administering and automating SharePoint Online when used with PowerShell.

Sending  REST requests to a SharePoint Online 

In the previous post we’ve already covered how to perform read operations by sending HTTPS requests to SharePoint RESTful web services. This time we are going to extend PowerShell script  in order to support all the CRUD operations.

The Invoke-RestSPO function sends  HTTPS requests to SharePoint REST web services that returns richly structured data (JSON)

Request Digests

Since SharePoint requires the user to include a request digest value with each create, update and delete operation, an additional request is invoked using Get-SPOContextInfo function to request Context Info entity that contains request digest value.

 ETag

In order to avoid an additional request, “*” eTag value is used to match any eTag value resulting in the operation being performed regardless of the actual value.

Lists manipulation using REST API in PowerShell

This section contains sample code for all of the CRUD operations.

References

 

Working with the SharePoint Online REST service via PowerShell

Since SharePoint 2013 introduces a Representational State Transfer (REST) service that is comparable to the existing SharePoint client object models, it opens up a huge capabilities, in particular for administering and automating SharePoint Online when used with PowerShell.

My first idea was to utilize  Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet, which was introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0.  Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet contains Credential parameter which could  accept basic, digest, NTLM, and Kerberos authentication.

SharePoint Client Component SDK comes with  a SharePointOnlineCredentials class  which represents an object that provides credentials to access SharePoint Online resources. But unfortunately SharePoint Online credentials could not be passed in Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet, since claims based authentication is not supported by this cmdlet.

Below is demonstrated a simplified PowerShell script  that to some extent mimics Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet. This script is intended for sending HTTPS request to a SharePoint Online REST service:

Examples

References

Some tips and tricks of using SharePoint Client Object Model in PowerShell. Part 1

Overview

When it comes to using SharePoint 2010 Client Object Model (CSOM) we need to be ready for certain kind of  limitations  in PowerShell. First of all, it concerns the usage of Generics Methods, for the example ClientRuntimeContext.Load<T> method:

An attempt to call the method ClientRuntimeContext.Load<T> directly will result in the following error PSGenericMethods

This is a limitation of PowerShell  (V1, V2) AFIK. There are several options how to bypass this limitation but in this post I would like to concentrate only on one technique that was originally described in the post Invoking Generic Methods on Non-Generic Classes in PowerShell. The basic idea is to replace the call for ClientRuntimeContext.Load<T> method with the following one:

For invoking a generic methods we utilize MethodInfo.MakeGenericMethod method. Below are demonstrated some examples of usage SharePoint 2010 Client Object Model (CSOM) in PowerShell.

Example: load Web client object

Let’s start with a simple example for loading Web Client Object:

Example: create Wiki page via CSOM

The example below demonstrates how to create wiki page via CSOM.

C# version:

PowerShell version:

MyFirstWikiPage

Summary

In contrary to article Using PowerShell to Get Data from a SharePoint 2010 List that explains how to execute generic methods via inline C#  in PowerShell, this post demonstrates how to utilize Generics Methods in PowerShell natively.

References